A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

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InControl’s Metrix Atrioverter (1990-1998)

 InControl was founded in 1990 in Redmond, WA to develop an implantable device for treating atrial fibrillation.  In November 1995, InControl announced the first human implant of its Metrix atrioverter. The implantable atrioverter system consisted of an implantable atrial defibrillator (model 3000 or 3020) connected to right atrial (perimeter right atrial model 7205) and coronary sinus (perimeter coronary sinus model 7109)

 
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Cactus/Freescale Semiconductor ICs for Implantable Medical Devices

Image Credit: Freescale Semiconductor, from “Integrated Circuits for Implantable Medical Devices”  An article by Steve Taranovich in the December 15, 2011 issue of EDN discussed technologies that are expected to be hot in 2012. One of these is the implantable chipset being developed by a collaborative effort between Cactus Semiconductor of Chandler, AZ and semiconductor giant

 
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Victhom Human Bionics’ Neurostep Implantable Closed-Loop Stimulator for Foot Drop

Image Credit: Victhom Human Bionics Victhom Human Bionics was founded in 2002 in Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, Canada. The company’s Neurobionix business unit develops its implantable closed-loop system devices. The Neurostep® is a neurostimulator designed to be implanted into the patient’s leg. Electrodes are attached to the peripheral nerves responsible for sensing and stimulating the muscles that lift

 
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Spinal Modulation’s Neurostimulator for the Stimulation of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

Image Credit: Spinal Modulation   Spinal Modulation was founded by Mir Imran in Menlo Park, CA in 2004.  The company has developed an implantable neurostimulator to deliver signals to the primary sensory neurons located within the dorsal root ganglion (DRG).  The idea is that unlike dorsal column spinal cord stimulation, the Spinal Modulation system breaks the

 
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Why Do So Many Novel Implantables Use a “Boxy” Enclosure?

  Active implantable medical devices are typically enclosed in a hermetically-sealed titanium housing which provides protection of the circuitry and other components. Commonly, Grade 1 titanium is formed into the enclosure using stamping. The pretty, rounded shapes of modern pacemakers and ICDs are achieved by having two enclosure halves shallowly stamped from sheet stock material,

 
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Nevro’s Senza Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulator for Back and Leg Pain

Image Source: Nevro’s Website Nevro Corporation (formerly NBI Development) was founded in 2006 by Dr. Konstantinos Alataris.  The Menlo Park, CA company developed a pain management concept that originated at the Mayo Clinic into a spinal cord stimulation system for back and leg pain. According to Nevro, their unique stimulation waveform achieves pain relief without paresthesia or uncomfortable stimulation.  Few details

 
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