A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

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St. Jude 4Q IPG Sales: CRM Down 4%, Neuromodulation 12% Up vs. Q4 2010

Yesterday, Jan 9, 2011, St. Jude Medical announced preliminary revenue results for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2011: “Fourth quarter cardiac rhythm management sales were approximately $728 million, a 4 percent decrease compared with the fourth quarter of 2010. Fourth quarter sales of implantable cardiac defibrillators were approximately $436 million, a 5 percent decrease

 
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Implantable-Device.com is Back On-Line!

I apologize for yesterday’s interruption of service in this blog.  I moved hosting company because the old one was too slow and unreliable. Unfortunately, I fell for the 5-star reviews which actually ended up being paid by the hosting company…  I wish that they would invest half their marketing dollars on lowering server load. Oh

 
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American Optical Cardio-Care II Demand Pacemaker (ca. 1971)

  The Cardio Care II Pacemaker was American Optical’s second implantable device.  It was an improved version of the Cardio Care pacemaker.  Besides improvements to the circuitry, the circuit board was enclosed separately inside a hermetic can within the epoxy encapsulation.

 
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American Optical Cardio-Care Demand Pacemaker (1968)

Barouh Berkovits at American Optical Co of Boston, MA designed the first “Demand Pacemaker” – what we now know as a VVI pacemaker. The Cardio-Care Demand Pacemaker, introduced in 1968, was American Optical’s first implantable device. From Kirk Jeffrey’s Machines in our Hearts(2001): “Berkovits in 1963 designed a sensing capability into the pacemaker. His invention behaved exactly like an

 
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Biotectix

Image Credit: Biotectix Biotectix of Ann Arbor, MI recently contacted me to let me know of new conductive polymer materials that they are developing to enhance the performance of next-gen implantable stimulation and sensing devices. Indeed, their materials sound very promising.  According to Biotectix, their electrode coatings and device components are made from proprietary conducting polymers that provide

 
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Nanowattics: Ultra-Low-Power ASIC Design for Implantable Devices

 Nanowattics was founded in 2007 to provide development services of ultra-low-power application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for safety-critical applications. Nanowattics’ core team is extremelly experienced in the design of ASICs for implantable medical devices.  Their designs include the main ASIC for a DDDR pacemaker,  a sub-microvolt differential amplifier for electroneurographic signal acquisition, and the chipset for a

 
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A Challenge to History Buffs: Who Was Digikon?

I took this picture a very long time ago at the office of one of my implanter friends in Europe.  Ever since then, I’ve tried to find out about “Digikon,” but have had no luck so far.  All that I have been able to find from the St. Jude legacy device database is that Digikon had produced

 
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Cook Pacemaker’s Sensor Kelvin 504 Central-Venous-Temperature-Sensing Pacemaker (ca. 1992)

In 1983, Bill Cook and Dr. Neal Fearnot began to work under the Cook Pacemaker Company in Leechburg, PA on developing the technology developed by Dr. Fearnot at Purdue University into an improved prototype for a temperature-based exercise responsive pacemaker that was released in 1988 as the Kelvin Sensor rate-responsive pacemaker.  One of the first CVT

 
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Intermedics’ Circadia Central Venous Temperature-Sensing Pacemaker (ca. 1993)

The Circadia pacemaker was one of the very few devices that had a lead-borne thermistor to measure cental venous temperature (CVT) as a sensor for rate-response. A unique feature of this pacemaker was an iridium-oxide (IrOx)-coated button welded to the can.  It was believed that this button would improve unipolar IEGM sensing and reduce unipolar

 
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Cook’s Sensor Kelvin and Intermedics’ Circadia Temperature-Sensing Rate-Responsive Pacemakers

  One of the indicators of metabolic demand that has been used for controlling the rate of pacemakers is central venous blood temperature (CVT). In 1983, Bill Cook and Dr. Neal Fearnot began to work under the Cook Pacemaker Company on developing the technology developed by Dr. Fearnot at Purdue University into an improved prototype for

 
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Medtronic’s Chronicle Implantable Hemodynamic Monitor for Heart Failure Monitoring

Image Credit: Medtronic The Medtronic Chronicle implantable hemodynamic monitor used a specialized RV lead/sensor.  The device was able to monitor and telemeter: Systolic and diastolic pressure Estimated pulmonary artery diastolic pressure RV dp/dt (positive & negative) Heart rate & activity Core body temperature Continuous remote monitoring

 
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Medcor Corporation’s Pacemakers (ca. 1975)

Medcor was established in Hollywood, FL in 1969, and began developing pacemakers, lead and accessories in 1971.  By 1975 it had a series of lithium-powered pacemaker in the market, but they never became popular with physicians. On July 1980, Daig Corporation of Minnetonka, MN acquired Medcor with the expectation that Medcor pacemaker technology could be profitably marketed. Daig had

 
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