A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

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Home Archive for category "Treated Conditions" (Page 7)
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St. Jude Medical Announces Clinical Benefits of Quadripolar CRT Pacing at ACC

St. Jude Medical announced that clinical findings on quadripolar pacing will be presented at the 61st Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC, Chicago, March 24-27 2012). According to St. Jude’s announcement, quadripolar pacing allows physicians the ability to use multisite left-ventricular (LV) pacing.  Studies that examined the role of multisite pacing in improving hemodynamics and

 
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ImThera Receives CE Mark for the Aura6000 System to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  ImThera Medical announced this week that it received the CE Mark for the Aura6000 System to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

 
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iPacemaker Implantable Pacemaker/ICD Database for the iPhone

My friend and colleague Dr. Irit Yaniv alerted me to this iPhone app that was just released.  It is an implantable pacemaker and defibrillator database that, according to its author, displays up to 70 parameters for each model, includes battery and longevity data, and links directly to product manuals.

 
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The Australian Pacemaker: Telectronics (1965-1995)

In 1965, Australian medical device pioneer Noel Gray established Telectronics – Australia’s first manufacturing facility for producing pacemakers that were designed in-house.  Telectronics was an innovative developer, achieving some major successes in the early cardiac pacing field, for example, Telectronics’ leads allowed narrowing the pacing pulse to its current nominal of 0.5 milliseconds; encapsulating the pacemaker in titanium

 
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DF-4 Connectors for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Enter Use in the US

The DF-4 Connector was recently introduced by a joint group of CRM companies, physicians, and regulatory agencies as a way of easing the implant of ICDs by reducing defibrillation connections from three to one and by minimizing the number of set screws.  Prior to the development of the DF-4, traditional high-voltage connector systems required up to three connections.

 
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Remon Medical’s Implantable Pulmonary Pressure Sensor (1997-2007)

Remon Medical Technologies, Ltd. was founded in 1997 in Caesarea, Israel to develop implantable, wireless pressure sensors. Remon developed an implantable hemodynamic monitor, which allowed on-demand, non-invasive, leadless self-monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure by the patient at home. ImPressure devices were placed in the pulmonary artery, and transmitted pressure readings to a hand-held monitor.  It was hoped that the

 
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SMSI® Implantable Glucose Sensor

Sensors for Medicine and Science, Inc. (SMSI)  of Germantown, MD was founded in 1997 to develop chemical sensing technologies based on fluorescence sensing. SMSI® is now developing an implantable glucose sensor that is designed to automatically measure interstitial glucose every few minutes. The sensor implant communicates wirelessly with a small external reader, allowing it to track

 
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Elema-Schoenander and the Very First Human Implants of a Pacemaker in Sweden (1958) and Uruguay (1960)

This is a picture of the first pacemaker to be implanted in a human patient.  It was developed by Dr. Rune Elmqvist (1906–1996), a physician by training, but working for the Swedish company Elema-Schonander as an engineer.   Dr. Elmqvist  developed the device in cooperation of Åke Senning, senior physician and cardiac surgeon at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Sweden.

 
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MicroCHIPS’ Implantable Drug Delivery Device for the Treatment of Osteoporosis

MicroCHIPS was founded in 1999 as an MIT spinoff to develop implantable sensors and drug-delivery devices. MicroCHIPS’ drug-delivery technology is based on proprietary reservoir arrays that are used to store potent drugs within the body for long periods of time.  Individual device reservoirs can be opened on demand or on a predetermined schedule to precisely control

 
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Neuromed’s TIME Battery- and RF-Powered Totally Implantable Multichannel Spinal Cord Stimulator (ca. 1988)

Neuromed was formed in 1980 with an initial capitalization of $150,000 by Bill Borkan through money obtained when Borkan`s parents took out a second mortgage on their home. Borkan’s desire to help his sister, Jennie, a cerebral palsy patient, got him started in neurostimulation technology. In the next few years, Neuromed developed and marketed a

 
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St. Jude’s (ANS) Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulators Eon and Eon Mini

In 2005, St. Jude Medical purchased Advanced Neuromodulation Systems (ANS) in Plano, Texas.  ANS had developed a number of spinal cord stimulation IPGs that were either externally powered via inductive link, internally powered by a primary cell, or internally powered by a transcutaneously rechargeable lithium-ion cell. Today, the most popular St. Jude spinal cord stimulators are the rechargeable

 
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Intermedics’ First Pacemakers (Mid 1970s)

In 1973, former Medtronic sales representative Albert Beutel founded Intermedics in Freeport, TX.  The first product was a small, mercury-cell-powered pacemaker.  In 1974 Intermedics introduced a lithium-powered version, and in 1976 it introduced InterLith which was hermetically sealed, and weighed just 65 grams.  At the time, InterLith’s size was a breakthrough, and became a very popular device, solidifying Intermedics’ position in the industry.  

 
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Original Datasheet for Arco’s Nuclear Pacemakers (ca. 1974)

Some time ago, my friend and colleague Paul Spehr gave me a copy of Arco Medical’s product catalog.  I scanned the original datasheets for Arco Medical’s nuclear fixed-rate and demand pacemakers models NU-5 and NU-6 and posted them here in pdf format: Arco_Nuclear_Datasheets Click here for a color picture and more information on Arco Medical’s nuclear pacemakers.

 
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St. Jude’s DBS Study Confirms Benefit of Constant Current System for Parkinson’s Disease

Image Credit: St. Jude Medical Today St. Jude announced that its first controlled study of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) confirms benefit of constant current system for patients with Parkinson’s Disease. Results were published online today by The Lancet Neurology journal. The aim of the study was to evaluate the Libra(TM) and LibraXP(TM) DBS constant current systems

 
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American Optical Cardio-Care II Demand Pacemaker (ca. 1971)

  The Cardio Care II Pacemaker was American Optical’s second implantable device.  It was an improved version of the Cardio Care pacemaker.  Besides improvements to the circuitry, the circuit board was enclosed separately inside a hermetic can within the epoxy encapsulation.

 
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