A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

Facebook Twitter Gplus Flickr LinkedIn YouTube RSS
magnify
Home Archive for category "Treated Conditions" (Page 9)
formats

InControl’s Metrix Atrioverter (1990-1998)

 InControl was founded in 1990 in Redmond, WA to develop an implantable device for treating atrial fibrillation.  In November 1995, InControl announced the first human implant of its Metrix atrioverter. The implantable atrioverter system consisted of an implantable atrial defibrillator (model 3000 or 3020) connected to right atrial (perimeter right atrial model 7205) and coronary sinus (perimeter coronary sinus model 7109)

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on InControl’s Metrix Atrioverter (1990-1998)  comments 
formats

Victhom Human Bionics’ Neurostep Implantable Closed-Loop Stimulator for Foot Drop

Image Credit: Victhom Human Bionics Victhom Human Bionics was founded in 2002 in Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, Canada. The company’s Neurobionix business unit develops its implantable closed-loop system devices. The Neurostep® is a neurostimulator designed to be implanted into the patient’s leg. Electrodes are attached to the peripheral nerves responsible for sensing and stimulating the muscles that lift

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Victhom Human Bionics’ Neurostep Implantable Closed-Loop Stimulator for Foot Drop  comments 
formats

Spinal Modulation’s Neurostimulator for the Stimulation of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

Image Credit: Spinal Modulation   Spinal Modulation was founded by Mir Imran in Menlo Park, CA in 2004.  The company has developed an implantable neurostimulator to deliver signals to the primary sensory neurons located within the dorsal root ganglion (DRG).  The idea is that unlike dorsal column spinal cord stimulation, the Spinal Modulation system breaks the

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Spinal Modulation’s Neurostimulator for the Stimulation of the Dorsal Root Ganglion  comments 
formats

Nevro’s Senza Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulator for Back and Leg Pain

Image Source: Nevro’s Website Nevro Corporation (formerly NBI Development) was founded in 2006 by Dr. Konstantinos Alataris.  The Menlo Park, CA company developed a pain management concept that originated at the Mayo Clinic into a spinal cord stimulation system for back and leg pain. According to Nevro, their unique stimulation waveform achieves pain relief without paresthesia or uncomfortable stimulation.  Few details

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
3 Comments  comments 
formats

TransWorld’s Soul Mate Implantable Heart Transplant Rejection Monitor

Image Source: TransWorld Heart Corporation’s Website TransWorld Heart Corporation of Charlotte, NC, was founded by Dr. Charles Richardson in 2004.  The company developed an implantable device intended to replace routine post-transplant heart biopsies. TransWorld’s Soul Mate implantable system analyzes 9 intramyocardial electrogram parameters recorded from 4 or 6 configurations of 2 or 3 epicardial leads to detect allograft

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on TransWorld’s Soul Mate Implantable Heart Transplant Rejection Monitor  comments 
formats

Biomet EBI’s OsteoGen™ Implantable Bone-Growth Stimulator

It has been known for quite some time that bone growth is stimulated by DC electrical currents.  However, only relatively recently implantable stimulators have been developed for the application. In 1988 Biomet acquired Electrobiology Inc. (EBI) in Parsippany, NJ, a leader in bone-growth electrical stimulation and bone external fixation markets. EBI’s OsteoGen™ Bone Growth Stimulator is marketed by Biomet Inc.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Biomet EBI’s OsteoGen™ Implantable Bone-Growth Stimulator  comments 
formats

BioControl’s MiniatURO Muscle Stimulator to Alleviate Incontinence (1999-2006)

BioControl Medical, Ltd. was founded in 1999 by Yossi Gross, and is based in Yehud, Israel.  BioControl’s first devices were developed to treat incontinence due to overactive bladder, stress, and interstitial cystitis.  In 2006 American Medical Sytems acquired an exclusive license for the use of the technology in urology, gynaecology and other pelvic health applications. The BioControl MiniatURO

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on BioControl’s MiniatURO Muscle Stimulator to Alleviate Incontinence (1999-2006)  comments 
formats

BioControl’s CardioFit System for the Treatment of Heart Failure via Vagus Nerve Stimulation

BioControl Medical, Ltd. was founded in 1999 by Yossi Gross, and is based in Yehud, Israel.  BioControl’s first devices were developed to treat incontinence due to overactive bladder, stress, and interstitial cystitis.  In 2006 American Medical Sytems acquired an exclusive license for the use of the technology in urology, gynecology and other pelvic health applications.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on BioControl’s CardioFit System for the Treatment of Heart Failure via Vagus Nerve Stimulation  comments 
formats

Cameron Health’s Leadless Implantable Defibrillator

Cameron Health was founded in 2000 in San Clemente, CA to develop a leadless implantable defibrillator. The device does not require a lead to be implanted into the heart. Instead, the device has a lead that is tunneled beneath the skin from the upper left chest below the level of the clavicle to the level of about

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
1 Comment  comments 
formats

Medtronic’s Leadless Pacemakers

Medtronic announced at TEDMED 2010 that it is working on leadless pacemakers.  Dr. Stephen Osterle, senior vice president of medicine and technology and member of Medtronic’s Executive Management Team, unveiled the device. Osterle said that physicians will be able to control the device with a smart phone.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
1 Comment  comments 
formats

EBR System’s Wireless Pacemaker

EBR Systems, Inc., founded in 2003 and headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is developing the WiCS® Wireless Cardiac Stimulation technology to eliminate cardiac pacing leads, historically a major source of complications and reliability issues.  The startup was spun out of research by founder Debra Echt, a former professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Vanderbilt University.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on EBR System’s Wireless Pacemaker  comments 
formats

Nanostim’s Leadless Pacemaker

Nanostim is an early-stage AIMD company in Milpitas, CA that is developing a pacemaker that can be implanted inside the heart through a catheter.  The tiny device is attached directly to the heart, eliminating the need for leads. In May 2011 Nanostim announced that St. Jude Medical had made a substantial investment in the company. The company is operating in

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
1 Comment  comments 
formats

Glucose Fuel-Cell-Powered Implantable Devices

  My friend, Dr. Alain Ripart – the Chief Scientific Officer at Ela Medical (now part of Sorin) showed me this interesting contraption from his personal collection.  It is an experimental glucose-powered pacemaker developed in the 1970s.  It generated electricity by acquiring its fuel (glucose) directly from a living body to generate enough current to charge two NiCd cells

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Glucose Fuel-Cell-Powered Implantable Devices  comments 
formats

American Optical’s Nuclear Pacemaker (1970’s)

Barouh Berkovits at American Optical Co of Boston, MA designed the first “Demand Pacemaker” – what we now know as a VVI pacemaker.  As other companies in the 1970s, American Optical developed a nuclear-battery-powered version of their pacemaker. American Optical used a 3Ci Pu-238 Radioisotope Thermal Generator (RTG) produced by Fred Hittman’s Hittman Nuclear Development Corp. (Model NB-200).  It consisted of a tiny 8 Ci

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on American Optical’s Nuclear Pacemaker (1970’s)  comments 
formats

Medtronic’s Atomic Pacemaker (early 1970’s)

In the late 1960s Medtronic – today the largest manufacturer of implantable medical devices in the world – teamed up with Alcatel, a French company, to design a nuclear-powered pacemaker. The first human implant of the device took place in Paris in 1970. The nuclear battery in the Medtronic device used a tiny 2.5 Ci

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Medtronic’s Atomic Pacemaker (early 1970’s)  comments