A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

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Home Archive for category "History" (Page 2)
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Medtronic’s Chronicle Implantable Hemodynamic Monitor for Heart Failure Monitoring

Image Credit: Medtronic The Medtronic Chronicle implantable hemodynamic monitor used a specialized RV lead/sensor.  The device was able to monitor and telemeter: Systolic and diastolic pressure Estimated pulmonary artery diastolic pressure RV dp/dt (positive & negative) Heart rate & activity Core body temperature Continuous remote monitoring

 
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Medcor Corporation’s Pacemakers (ca. 1975)

Medcor was established in Hollywood, FL in 1969, and began developing pacemakers, lead and accessories in 1971.  By 1975 it had a series of lithium-powered pacemaker in the market, but they never became popular with physicians. On July 1980, Daig Corporation of Minnetonka, MN acquired Medcor with the expectation that Medcor pacemaker technology could be profitably marketed. Daig had

 
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Leptos Biomedical’s Splanchnic Nerve Stimulation For Treatment Of Obesity (2002-2010)

Leptos Biomedical was founded in Fridley, MN in 2002 by Dr. John D. Dobak.   Leptos intended to develop an implantable device to stimulate the greater splanchnic nerve, that was hoped would  result in reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure. In February 2010 Leptos announced its closure.  Reasons were not provided, but it has been suggested that the decision

 
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InControl’s Metrix Atrioverter (1990-1998)

 InControl was founded in 1990 in Redmond, WA to develop an implantable device for treating atrial fibrillation.  In November 1995, InControl announced the first human implant of its Metrix atrioverter. The implantable atrioverter system consisted of an implantable atrial defibrillator (model 3000 or 3020) connected to right atrial (perimeter right atrial model 7205) and coronary sinus (perimeter coronary sinus model 7109)

 
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Glucose Fuel-Cell-Powered Implantable Devices

  My friend, Dr. Alain Ripart – the Chief Scientific Officer at Ela Medical (now part of Sorin) showed me this interesting contraption from his personal collection.  It is an experimental glucose-powered pacemaker developed in the 1970s.  It generated electricity by acquiring its fuel (glucose) directly from a living body to generate enough current to charge two NiCd cells

 
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American Optical’s Nuclear Pacemaker (1970’s)

Barouh Berkovits at American Optical Co of Boston, MA designed the first “Demand Pacemaker” – what we now know as a VVI pacemaker.  As other companies in the 1970s, American Optical developed a nuclear-battery-powered version of their pacemaker. American Optical used a 3Ci Pu-238 Radioisotope Thermal Generator (RTG) produced by Fred Hittman’s Hittman Nuclear Development Corp. (Model NB-200).  It consisted of a tiny 8 Ci

 
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Arco Medical’s Nuclear-Powered Pacemaker (ca.1974)

An isotopic thermoelectric generator was developed in the US by Numec Corporation under a contract from the US Atomic Energy Commission and sold for $3,200 (back in 1974). The thermopile consisted of doped bismuth telluride pairs that were placed in a parallel/series arrangement to generate some 300 μW of power to run this Arco Medical

 
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Medtronic’s Atomic Pacemaker (early 1970’s)

In the late 1960s Medtronic – today the largest manufacturer of implantable medical devices in the world – teamed up with Alcatel, a French company, to design a nuclear-powered pacemaker. The first human implant of the device took place in Paris in 1970. The nuclear battery in the Medtronic device used a tiny 2.5 Ci

 
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CCC del Uruguay’s Atomic Pacemaker (1972)

This nuclear pacemaker was manufactured ca. 1972 by Dr. Orestes Fiandra’s CCC del Uruguay. It was powered by a McDonell-Douglas Betacel 400 which had promethium-147 sandwiched between semiconductor wafers. As the radioactive promethium isotope decays, it emits β-particles (electrons). The impact of the β-particles on a p-n junction causes a forward bias in the semiconductor

 
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CCC del Uruguay’s Early Mercury-Cell Pacemaker (1969)

This is one of my most prized possessions.  It is one of the very first pacemakers produced by CCC del Uruguay in 1969.  It was given to me by my friend, the late Dr. Orestes Fiandra, founder of CCC del Uruguay. On February 2, 1960, Dr. Orestes Fiandra and Dr. Roberto Rubio accomplished the first succesful long-term

 
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CCC Medical – Top OEM to AIMD Start-Ups

CCC is one of the oldest pacemaker manufacturers in the world. It was founded in 1969 by Dr. Orestes Fiandra, who performed the first succesful, human, long-term pacemaker implant in the world. This was achieved in Uruguay on February 2, 1960 by Dr. Orestes Fiandra and Dr. Roberto Rubio. The pacemaker was manufactured by Dr. Rune Elmqvist of

 
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Omikron Scientific – Israeli Pacemaker Company (1979-1985)

Omikron Scientific was a small-scale pacemaker company founded in Rehovot, Israel in 1979.  The company stopped pacemaker production in 1985. Besides pacemakers, Omikron also produced a skin substitute called Omniderm, which was a thin, transparent, flexible membrane. It was used when a biological dressing would otherwise have been used. Omikron’s pacemakers were all VVI and featured gradual decline Magnet Rate

 
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Northstar Neuroscience’s Renova Cortical Stimulation System (1999-2009)

Northstar was founded in 1999 as Vertis Neuroscience headquartered in Seattle, WA, and the original goal was to develop electrical stimulation for chronic back pain.  In 2003, under its new name, Northstar Neuroscience, then developed the Renova cortical stimulation system to deliver targeted electrical stimulation to the brain cortex as a treatment for stroke-related upper extremity.

 
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Transneuronix Transcend IPG for Obesity Treatment

Transneuronix, Inc. was founded in 1995 and was based in Mount Arlington, New Jersey. It was acquired by Medtronic in 2005. Before its acqusition by Medtronic, Transneuronix developed the Transcend, an implantable gastric stimulator device for the treatment of obesity by electrical stimulation of the stomach.  Later, Medtronic developed the Transcend II IPG.

 
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Transoma’s Sleuth Implantable Wireless ECG Monitor

Transoma was the name that Data Sciences International of St Paul, MN adopted in 2003 when it re-fucused its animal telemetry implant business to develop an implantable wireless system to capture electrocardiogram data for diagnosing human cardiac arrhythmias, as well as to monitor the electrical activity of the heart and transmit data from the patient’s home

 
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