A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

Facebook Twitter Gplus Flickr LinkedIn YouTube RSS
magnify
Home Archive for category "Tech Talk" (Page 2)
formats

Purdue University’s Concept for Music-Powered Implantable Devices

  A group of researchers at Purdue University led by Prof. Babak Ziaie developed a vibrating cantilever that is excited by an external bass source from 200-500 Hz. The excitation causes the cantilever to vibrate, generating electricity and storing a charge in a capacitor. Although playing tones within a certain frequency range would be ideal, the

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Purdue University’s Concept for Music-Powered Implantable Devices  comments 
formats

Crazy Pacemaker Hack: d.i.y. High-Speed Photography

This is a hack that combines three of my favorite passions: pacemakers, photography, and coffee! I took this photograph by feeding the output of an infrared barrier to the atrium input of an old DDD pacemaker, setting an appropriate AV delay, and using the ventricular output to trigger a camera flash (via a optoisolator).  In

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
5 Comments  comments 
formats

St. Jude’s (ANS) Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulators Eon and Eon Mini

In 2005, St. Jude Medical purchased Advanced Neuromodulation Systems (ANS) in Plano, Texas.  ANS had developed a number of spinal cord stimulation IPGs that were either externally powered via inductive link, internally powered by a primary cell, or internally powered by a transcutaneously rechargeable lithium-ion cell. Today, the most popular St. Jude spinal cord stimulators are the rechargeable

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
1 Comment  comments 
formats

Biotectix

Image Credit: Biotectix Biotectix of Ann Arbor, MI recently contacted me to let me know of new conductive polymer materials that they are developing to enhance the performance of next-gen implantable stimulation and sensing devices. Indeed, their materials sound very promising.  According to Biotectix, their electrode coatings and device components are made from proprietary conducting polymers that provide

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Biotectix  comments 
formats

Reliability Analysis of Active Implantable Medical Devices

We conduct reliability analyses for our implantable devices on a continued basis.  I’ve spent the last few days readying the data for this period’s analysis, and thought that  a short primer on how this is actually done would be of interest to fellow engineers who may need it at some point. You surely have heard

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
Comments Off on Reliability Analysis of Active Implantable Medical Devices  comments