A blog about what is new (and old) in the world of active implantable medical devices 

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Home Archive for category "Technologies" (Page 2)
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Monash University in Australia Starts Test of Direct-to-Brain Visual Prosthesis Chips

Engineers from the Monash Vision Group (MVG) have begun trialling the ASICs for a direct-to-brain visual prosthesis that is expected to enter human clinical trials in 2014. The prosthesis will consist of a tiny camera mounted into a pair of glasses, which acts as the retina; a pocket processor, which takes the electronic information from

 
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Magnetically-Coupled Motor/Generator Transfers 100 mW to Implant at 50 cm Range

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems developed a magnetically-coupled motor/generator system that they claim is able to transcutaneously transfer 100 mW to an implant up to 50 cm away. In the external power-transfer module, a rotating magnet driven by an EC motor generates a magnetic rotary field. A magnetic pellet in

 
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Medtronic Receives CE Mark for CapSure Sense MRI™ SureScan® Pacing Leads

Medtronic today announced the receipt of CE Mark and launch of the CapSure Sense MRI™ SureScan® pacing leads, which are approved for use during MRI procedures.  The newly approved leads are the smallest MR–Conditional leads available in the world with a 5.3 French isodiametric lead body.  The new leads are passive-fixation leads.  Previously approved Medtronic MR–Conditional leads

 
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News from Stanford: Modelling Tissue as a Dielectric Shows Feasibility of Inductive Power Transfer at 1 GHz

Stanford Engineering assistant professor  Ada Poon demonstrated a tiny, wirelessly powered, self-propelled medical device capable of controlled motion through blood.  The device drives electrical current directly through the fluid, which in the presence of an external magnetic field creates a directional force that pushes the device forward. This type of device is capable of moving at

 
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Purdue University’s Concept for Music-Powered Implantable Devices

  A group of researchers at Purdue University led by Prof. Babak Ziaie developed a vibrating cantilever that is excited by an external bass source from 200-500 Hz. The excitation causes the cantilever to vibrate, generating electricity and storing a charge in a capacitor. Although playing tones within a certain frequency range would be ideal, the

 
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“Data Block” Percutaneous Implantable Electrical Connector

The development of medical devices, drugs, and treatments depends on accurately retrieving clinical data from implanted animals. Implantable data collecting and sensing devices provide one way to retrieve these data. These device often include sensors or electrodes which must be implanted within the subject in order to provide clinicians with access to the sensed information.

 
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Neuromed’s TIME Battery- and RF-Powered Totally Implantable Multichannel Spinal Cord Stimulator (ca. 1988)

Neuromed was formed in 1980 with an initial capitalization of $150,000 by Bill Borkan through money obtained when Borkan`s parents took out a second mortgage on their home. Borkan’s desire to help his sister, Jennie, a cerebral palsy patient, got him started in neurostimulation technology. In the next few years, Neuromed developed and marketed a

 
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St. Jude’s (ANS) Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulators Eon and Eon Mini

In 2005, St. Jude Medical purchased Advanced Neuromodulation Systems (ANS) in Plano, Texas.  ANS had developed a number of spinal cord stimulation IPGs that were either externally powered via inductive link, internally powered by a primary cell, or internally powered by a transcutaneously rechargeable lithium-ion cell. Today, the most popular St. Jude spinal cord stimulators are the rechargeable

 
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Biotectix

Image Credit: Biotectix Biotectix of Ann Arbor, MI recently contacted me to let me know of new conductive polymer materials that they are developing to enhance the performance of next-gen implantable stimulation and sensing devices. Indeed, their materials sound very promising.  According to Biotectix, their electrode coatings and device components are made from proprietary conducting polymers that provide

 
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NDI Medical’s Miniature MicroPulse Neurostimulator

Image Credit: SPR Therapeutics NDI Medical was founded in 2002 by Geoffrey B. Thrope to develop and commercialize neurodevice products.  NDI Medical developed the MicroPulse neurostimulator, a thumb-sized, rechargeable pulse generator, that has been used for the treatment of incontinence and pain, as well as an implantable device for the restoration of function of paralyzed limbs. According to a 2006

 
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Nevro’s Senza Rechargeable Spinal Cord Stimulator for Back and Leg Pain

Image Source: Nevro’s Website Nevro Corporation (formerly NBI Development) was founded in 2006 by Dr. Konstantinos Alataris.  The Menlo Park, CA company developed a pain management concept that originated at the Mayo Clinic into a spinal cord stimulation system for back and leg pain. According to Nevro, their unique stimulation waveform achieves pain relief without paresthesia or uncomfortable stimulation.  Few details

 
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EBR System’s Wireless Pacemaker

EBR Systems, Inc., founded in 2003 and headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is developing the WiCS® Wireless Cardiac Stimulation technology to eliminate cardiac pacing leads, historically a major source of complications and reliability issues.  The startup was spun out of research by founder Debra Echt, a former professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Vanderbilt University.

 
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CCC Medical – Top OEM to AIMD Start-Ups

CCC is one of the oldest pacemaker manufacturers in the world. It was founded in 1969 by Dr. Orestes Fiandra, who performed the first succesful, human, long-term pacemaker implant in the world. This was achieved in Uruguay on February 2, 1960 by Dr. Orestes Fiandra and Dr. Roberto Rubio. The pacemaker was manufactured by Dr. Rune Elmqvist of

 
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MicroTransponder’s Injectable Stimulators

    MicroTransponder was founded in Dallas, TX in  2007 when it licensed technology developed at University of Texas in Dallas (UTD) by Larry Cauller, who heads the cortical connections lab. The first wireless transponder was developed under a DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics grant to create a bi-directional neural interface for a prosthetic hand.

 
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Enopace Biomedical

Enopace Biomedical Ltd. was founded in 2008 by Yossi Gross in Caesarea, Israel. Very scant details are available besides that it is developing a neuromodulation system to treat patients with congestive heart failure. According to the company, its technology consists of a minimally invasive, implantable neurostimulation device that increases cardiac efficiency by reducing left ventricular workload. From Enopace’s patent

 
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